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Idealistic vs. Realistic

February 12th, 2017 by stephanie

While sitting at a business lunch, across from a gentleman who works at a university in the alumni donations space, the conversation turned to recent events in our country. Unless you have been living under a rock, there’s been a lot of unrest, to say the least.

That is when this particular college representative made a flippant comment. He seemed to feel very proud of his point, stating in regards to the current issue at hand,  “What would Jesus do…?”  This statement was to be an indictment on laws being debated on topics that pertain to immigration, free speech and more. He seemed a bit inspired that students at his very conservative university were even wanting to be involved in the protesting. (I wondered how his donor base might feel about that.)

What struck me at that point was a number of things.

However, to answer his question, if only in my mind and not aloud at the table, I instantly thought of the Scriptures that share of the story of Jesus being approached on the issue of taxes. Basically, Jesus told them to abide by the laws of the land. Obey the authorities at hand. (Ironically, when it came to religious laws, he and his disciples were known to break those left and right!)

It was at that point, I realized this individual, who is a representative of higher learning, was not only unaware of the laws of our land that are currently on the books (and not being followed), he was showing our table he truly didn’t know the depths of the Bible. His institution being that of Christian by name, left me very much wondering.

But back to “What would Jesus do?” The passage I referred to earlier may be familiar to you,”Render unto Caesar what is Caesar’s, and to God what is God’s.” Basically, “If it’s the law—obey it.”

The New Testament calls on believers to support their governments, even when harsh or when they don’t agree. It NEVER encourages Christians to rebel, to destroy, or to tear down what is in place.

As my mind wandered, and as the speaker for the luncheon droned on, I kept wishing I could have discussion with this tablemate. But alas, sadly, in today’s climate, no one knows how to debate. They just scream, pound the table, demand their way or get angry if you don’t agree with them. My colleague sitting next to me pointed that out when we looked at each other after the lunch and had the same thought. How we wished for sober conversation for both sides. But, alas, that won’t happen. At least not in today’s climate.

I then mused about people who have security detail, or who live in gated or walled areas. I was surprised to think of how many of them are against a “wall” and are pro gun-control as well. Being that they themselves are personally secure at all times (or so they assume), the power of the issue for those who are left feeling not-as-secure—alludes them.

But let’s get back to ideal vs. real.

Idealism: My dog thinks the world is a great safe place. He doesn’t like it when I tell him what to do or thwart him in regards to his will or wishes. I keep a short leash on him, as they say. What he doesn’t understand is that dangers, and evil people, do, in fact, exist. Visit any prison, or hospital or vet where abuse has been clearly dealt upon a victim.

Realism: We have laws in order to be able to live in peace with each other and to live protected. Order is a good thing. Look at any third-world country, and I hope you can see that. If it is OK for me to hit you, break into your home, crash your car or steal from you, then you can’t live in peace. We can’t have lives of liberty and happiness with no rule of law, or order. That would be a life of fear and anxiety.

Fact: We do live in a wonderful country. It’s amazing, and if you have traveled at all, you know exactly what I mean.

But, reality is this: simply trying to believe that evil doesn’t exist if we don’t want it to, and that by thinking good thoughts, and believing people are good, will cause that wish to be so?  That isn’t realistic. It isn’t truth. It’s just an idea. A thought.

That being said, we all know thoughts are indeed powerful. It’s important to think “good” thoughts and to avoid the negative and toxic.  Climbing into a hole, however, isn’t the answer. Closing the door while the fire is burning in the front yard, is not going to solve the problem.

So, what’s a person to do?

Why….start with obeying The Golden Rule, of course!  Do unto others as you would have them do to unto you.

You can read it here: “Do to others whatever you would like them to do to you. This is the essence of all that is taught in the law and the prophets.”

And too—Follow the rules…It’s best for all of us.

I end with some words that have always been encouraging to me. I hope you find them comforting as well.

Let us not grow weary in well-doing, for in due time we will reap a harvest, if we do not give up.

—Just my thoughts…

S.

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Call the question, will ya?

January 29th, 2017 by stephanie

When I first moved to Nashville, in an attempt to meet more people and at the encouragement of my grandmother, I joined a club. Those people were a wonderful group who not only became friends, in time they became like family. We shared many happy and amazing memories together, and there were moments where we had the privilege of experiencing and witnessing some very historic events.

But to my point. I ended up on the board of this illustrious group and I must admit, many times their talents and abilities left me feeling quite inadequate. Not only could they debate, quite well, they knew Robert’s Rules of Order. Parliamentary Procedure was something I had heard of often in my life, but as to what it truly was, or how to follow it in a meeting? I had no clue!

At some point, during any of our meetings, there would always be a moment when someone would “Call the question.” For years, that term alluded me. We are sitting here discussing a decision that needs to be made and people are arguing both sides. What on earth is the question? I would think to myself. My brain just couldn’t seem to wrap around the meaning. Those were my thoughts. Until lately.

The power of that simple “rule” hit me recently. Isn’t it funny how years later, dots just seem to connect and things that once weren’t clear suddenly make sense? Yeah, that happened.

So, Calling the Question? It’s a moment in discussion that is truly a remarkable blessing given to civilized nations.

Basically: when discussing a topic, at some point, debate needs to end. You need to agree to end the debate and move toward the vote. You vote to end the discussion. Then, after the vote, that is when you ask the question: “Will we or won’t we do, or agree to, this or that?”

In regards to the topic at hand, you are asking which of the two options on the table are best. Unfortunately, when these rules aren’t followed, one person in the room usually ends up pushing their opinion and demanding their way. Or, pouting when they don’t get it.

These days, we could use a bit of decorum, or at least a return to structure, in our conversations or dialogues. It seems we have forgotten how to share our point of view in a pleasant or positive way. Protocol or discernment seems to be a way of the past. But more importantly, rather than asking questions, people just state their opinions. No one “asks” the other person to explain. Then, allows them the time and dignity to do so.

What has truly been lost is looking at an entire situation at hand, weighing the facts on both sides, having healthy debate, then, deciding what is the best decision…for the good of the order. “Should we go with Option A or is Option B best at this point in time?”

I’m reminded of situations in my life where I wish I would have asked for more facts before rushing to judgment, or where I wish the person angrily sitting across from me had acquired some truthful information before making their attack on me.

You may know what I’m talking about. You may even be in the middle of a situation at this time that drives this lesson home or at least brings it to mind.

All Ears!

With that, let’s commit this week to:

  • Not jumping the gun before truly looking at the facts,
  • Not pushing our viewpoint on someone before we ask for the other side,
  • And not blocking out or ignoring the opposing party when it’s their turn to talk.
  • Then, once all of the facts are on the table, and all sides have thoroughly been heard…

—let’s call the question.

The best answer, at that point, might actually surprise us.

—Just my thoughts.

S.

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Until the Cows Come Home

January 15th, 2017 by stephanie

Imagine looking up only to see something you lost awhile back, coming up your driveway, arriving on a cart that’s being pulled by cows. Sounds strange, but that’s exactly what happened to the children of Israel after they once lost the Ark of the Covenant in battle.

Long story short, while at war with the Philistines, which was quite often, during one particular battle, the bad guys captured the Ark. During its stay in enemy territory, this coveted piece of temple furniture, began to wreak havoc on its captors.

At one point, they placed it in the temple of their god Dagon. The next morning, when they came in, the huge statue of their god was lying face down on the ground. Seemed odd, but they weren’t too concerned, so they propped it back up. When they returned the next day, they found the stone idol shattered in pieces on the floor.

That’s when they began to worry. Boils, plagues, and a few other uncomfortable issues later, the Philistines realized they’d bit off more than they could chew. They were up against a God who was on a completely different level. Basically, they were out of their league and playing with dynamite.

That’s when they began strategizing a plan to return the now despised trophy. Here’s what they came up with:

  • Place the ark on a cart
  • Hook it up to some cows, then,
  • Point them in the direction of its original home
  • Pray they find the cows find their way there on their own

The result? It worked.

One day, some months later, the Jewish people looked up only to see their beloved ark coming up the drive with the cows “lowing as it went.” Quite a spectacle indeed!

Now of course, this is a very truncated version of the entire story, and you are certainly invited to do some careful reading on your own, but there truly is a point here to be noticed.

Maybe you made a mistake and you lost something in the process. Perhaps an enemy of yours was able to obtain something that was very precious to you. Or, on the flip side, let’s say you won a battle fair and square, but the consequences are now staring you in the face. Regardless of the situation at hand, you’re hurting and something that is rightfully yours is gone—or the victory isn’t working out like you planned.

Is it the end? Perhaps not.

If you feel that thing you lost can’t be restored, or what you won isn’t worth the cost…I hope this story will be an encouragement to you.

Let’s face it, the Israelites were beaten in their battle fair and square. What the Philistines didn’t realize is that they were tampering with God’s people. Not something for the faint of heart to try and do. God’s children are just that—his kids. And God protects his children. And if He gives them something and that He wants them to have, people who try to take it away from them should be careful. Life may not bode so well for the taker.

If you are the person with the loss here, again, may this story shed a new light on your situation and bring you a bit of hope. Battles between humans are one thing, but when a person throws a grenade at you and God steps in between? Buyer beware. Remember the god Dagon and his demise—the boils, the plagues, etc. Don’t be surprised if you find your tormentor one day saying, “Uncle. Here. Take it back. I’ll even send it to you.” Maybe it won’t return on a silver platter, but hey, if it were even to arrive via cows, I don’t know about you, but I’d take it.

Just my thoughts on a cold drizzly Sunday.

– Stephanie

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A Long Way from Mason Street…

November 20th, 2016 by stephanie

img_2143-mason-street-schoohouse-stamp

Mason Street Schoolhouse Old Town San Diego

When I was a young girl, living in the San Diego area (Escondido, CA), my maternal grandmother was devoted to making sure I had a healthy view of the world. Not only that, she was adamant that I learn culture and that I be exposed to it. She was also extremely keen on my being politically aware. All of the above passions, I can proudly say, she passed along to me.

On one of our usual excursions, she took my mother and me to Old Town San Diego for the day. There I experienced a step back in time, to another era, and another America really. I recall being stunned by what I found. Not the room or the desks, but what was nailed to the wall is what burned into my memory and my mind. What am I referring to?  The framed Expectations of a Teacher and the Punishment List which featured the exact consequences poorly behaved attendees would face.

mason-street-schoolhouseLong before I would attend night school to become a credentialed teacher myself, I learned that educators of yesteryear, and our country, were now a far cry from the schools I knew of even my day. In that early pioneer environment, however, there was not a lot of flexibility or room for discussion, as we will see below.

It’s hard for us to imagine, when you review the 1872 Instructions for Teachers, that someone would commit their life to that standard. But they did. Inspite of what folks today might cry out as “horrific” or “abusive,” amazingly, we as a nation survived, and evolved, and the rural students who attended got some good educations.

It’s even harder still to imagine, in the world of today, that those mean, cruel teachers would actually carry out the punishments that were tacked to schoolhouse walls without parents screaming for them to step down or be removed. But they didn’t. They supported the teacher.

Now, that being said, I don’t condone the teacher who slapped my paternal grandmother’s hand with a ruler because she used her left hand! Thank the Lord we have moved past that bizarre mindset.

If you don’t know what I am referring to, and if you haven’t had a chance to visit a place like the Mason Street Schoolhouse, here is a quick sharing of what I am referring to….

1872 Instructions to Teachers Mason Street School

1872 Instructions to Teachers

1872 INSTRUCTIONS TO THE TEACHERS
1. Teachers will fill lamps, clean chimneys and trim wicks each day.

2. Each teacher will bring a scuttle of coal and a bucket of water for the day’s use.

3. Make your pens carefully. You may whittle nibs for the individual tastes of children.

4. Men teachers may take one evening each week for courting purposes or two evenings if they go to church regularly.

5. After ten hours in the school the teacher should spend the remaining time reading the Bible and other good books.

6. Women teachers who marry or engage in other unseemly conduct will be dismissed.

7. Every teacher who smokes, uses liquor in any form, frequents pool or public halls, or gets shaved in a barber shop will give good reasons to suspect his worth, intentions, integrity and honesty.

8. The teacher who performs his labors faithfully without fault for five years will be given an increase of 25 cents a week in his pay — providing the Board of Education approves.

Mason Street Schoolhouse

1872 Punishments

Punishments
1. Boys and Girls Playing Together: 4 lashes
2. Fighting at School: 5 lashes
3. Quarreling at School: 5 lashes
4. Gambleing or Betting at School: 4 lashes
5. Playing at Cards at School: 10 lashes
6. Climbing for Every Foot Over Three Feet Up a Tree: 1 lash
7. Telling Lyes: 7 lashes
8. Telling Tales Out of School: 8 lashes
9. Giving Each Other Ill Names: 8 lashes
10. Swaring at School: 8 lashes
11. For Misbehaving to Girls: 10 lashes
12. For Drinking Spiritous Liquors at School: 8 lashes
13. Making Swings and Swinging on Them: 7 lashes
14. For Waring Long Finger Nails: 2 lashes
15. Misbehaving to Persons on the Road: 4 lashes
16. For Going to Girls Play Places: 3 lashes
17. Girl Going to Boys Play Places: 3 lashes
18. Going to School with Dirty Faces and Hands: 2 lashes
19. Calling Each Other Liars: 4 lashes
20. For Wrestling at School: 4 lashes
21: For Weting Each Other Washing at Playtime: 2 lashes
22. Scuffling at School: 4 lashes
23. For Going and Playing about the Mill or Creek: 6 lashes
24. For going about the Barn or doing any Mischief about the Place: 7 lashes

It truly is interesting to revisit and reflect upon our history. And too, to review it against where we are today. What parts of what we see are good and worth keeping, and what areas might need a refresher course or gentle reminder of things that are better or best? Whereas our country was more on the same page in those “olden” days, and seemed to fall in step, in today’s world, we have moved more to personal truths—not a core or foundational truth shared by the masses. So, I guess, this conversation would be more objective these days.

Whatever the case, taking stock personally is where it all should, and actually does, begin.

In the coming week, let’s challenge each other to view what part of this  history lesson encourages us, inspires us or lights up our passion. If you would like to share, I’d love to hear….info@stephaniehuffman.org. Or, just leave a comment!

With that, just my thoughts.

S.

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What’s New?

November 13th, 2016 by stephanie

statue-of-liberty-1045266_1280It’s interesting how the term “What’s new?” has changed. It used to be a type of greeting, asking the receiver of those words how they were doing and inquiring of them hoping to learn what all was going on in their life.

Lately, it’s used as a more sarcastic response and as an answer, rather than as a question. It has come to mean more of an “I’m not surprised” retort. A way of saying some things just don’t go the way you want or better yet, “That’s just the way it is.”

Solomon, in the book of Ecclesiastes, talks about how there is nothing new under the sun. We can try to be cutting edge, or stay one step ahead, but basically, we just repeat something that has, in all honesty, already been done before—in some sort of fashion.

This past week in America we held our presidential elections. At my age, I have now seen quite a few. One side always wins and one side always loses. What’s new about that? Nothing. What is a bit new these days is how people, today, handle the results.

I don’t recall destroying someone else’s property, shutting down freeways, beating someone up (who has the freedom to vote as they choose) or my professors canceling my tests or classes if my side didn’t win. Those were never options. At least, in my mind. For that matter, I don’t recall anyone else thinking or doing the same as I look back. Sure, I was upset and I prayed all the harder when my side lost, but it does feel a bit “new” to me when I see the changes in how we as a country currently respond.

What isn’t new is wanting to have our way. In the past, I think we tried to be mature Patriots and take the high road. We tried to be good sports. We were aware someone would not be the winner. Today, instead, we lecture people on how they should act and respond once the decision is made. But if the decision doesn’t meet to our liking, we don’t take our own advice. The message suddenly doesn’t apply when “our” side loses. At that point, it’s “game on!”

But is that actually “new?” Not really. Again, from the beginning of time, man has wanted his own way. You don’t have to teach a child to throw a tantrum when you say “no” or hold firm on an issue. It’s just human nature.

That’s the hard part. Fighting against, not each other, but the innate will and determination to get my own way —come you-know-what or high water.

I wish I would have learned much earlier in my life—that part about the what I expected of others, when the shoe was suddenly on the other foot, finding they would be expecting the same of me.

I guess some people learn quickly. I don’t think I truly did. But I am grateful for the opportunity for each new day to, perhaps, turn it around and begin anew.

At this point, I am asking those in my circle to pray for ourselves. To get it right in our own lives. And then, to pray for our country. Join me?

– S.

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People are weird!

September 25th, 2016 by stephanie

People Are Weird

People Are Weird

A girlfriend and I were chatting this past week. She’d had a bizarre encounter with a client who is also a friend. Let’s just say it was very stressful. In the end, actually, it was just plain weird. We both left the conversation shaking our heads.

We humans are an interesting lot. Sometimes, we even scratch our heads in wonder thinking, What just happened? “People these days are just crazy!” we often find ourselves saying out loud.

I’ve been reading in the book of Judges lately, and I have been reminded, this problem is not a new phenomenon.

I never cease to be amazed by the stories in that Old Testament book.(And believe me, there are plenty in there to leave you in wonderment.) One in particular, however, stood out to me recently.

The one I am choosing to chat about this week, however,  goes like this…

Jephthah is the child of a man via his prostitute.

This particular man also has a wife, who has children with him.

Therefore, Jephthah has step brothers and sisters. The siblings, obviously, don’t want their illegitimate brother to get any of the inheritance, and they are very clear about that point. So much so, that  they basically chase him out of town until he goes to live elsewhere. While there, in elsewhere, he accumulates a little band of brothers.

Meanwhile, back at the ranch, so to speak, the enemies of his people have descended, and the elders of the town run to find Jephthah and call him back to come and save them.

J’s response?

“You’ve got to be kidding me!”

[Well, probably not those exact words, but pretty close.]

Anyway, long story short, Jephthah, the  man warrior, takes on the bad guys, goes to war with them, and wins. Yay! Right?

No, not so fast.

While there should have been singing and dancing in the streets, instead, fellow tribesmen, from his people, hunt down Jephthah to chew him out. Whuh?

Yep…they are mad because Jephthahv didn’t come and get them and ask them to go to war with him.

ummm….seriously?

He reminds them that he did indeed ask them to join him, but they refused!

No words.

So, here’s the deal, in my humble opinion:

1. We humans are greedy and self-centered at our core. It just comes, sadly, all too naturally.  (AKA J’s siblings)

2. We, as people, love to complain when troubles come. And when they do, we go and try to find people to help us out of our situation, or at the least, to take our side.(Like J’s howmetown when they found themselves in trouble)

3. When a person does step in, takes charge, and is victorious, we tend to get jealous. It seems we all want to be part of the winning team. (Victor over the enemy/the one who solves the problem and gets the praise and attention is suddenly our best friend.)

Point of the story?

We have’t evolved much, really, as a people since ancient times. Human nature (something we can’t see or touch) seems to be replicating itself very well.

Tip?

We shouldn’t be shocked or surprised, by bad behavior or painful circumstances when they arrive. Stuff  happens.

Solution?

There isn’t a pill you can take to cure it or a vaccination to keep it away. It requires something non-physical to combat this non-physical problem. We’ll talk about that more in the coming days. But for a preview click here.

And there you have it; your everyday thought for your upcoming everyday week.

– S.

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1st World Problems

March 22nd, 2015 by stephanie

Namaste

Cleansing Breath…

I was driving down the road when she called. Having blue tooth in the car is a blessing, and I touched the “answer” button in anticipation of what was coming next. She’s always so bubbly and energetic, her conversations fill my emotional and mental “tank” if you will, so they are always a welcome treat.

“Ok, I know I shouldn’t complain…this is such a 1st world problem….” I had to laugh…but those words struck me. She was so balanced. So aware that the things that most likely bother us on a daily basis might be mundane and inane. If you think about it…when people are being beheaded and tortured by modern-day, 3rd-world barbarians just a few thousand miles away? I think you know where I’m going with this…

But alas, this was “her world” and she was living it and needed to vent. I have to admit, it was still a bit delightful in how she did it. I have much to learn from her.

In all honesty, there are days when I simply need an image of the holocuast to flash by a screen…and it’s enough to remind me, “Now, what was I just upset or thinking about?” Those moments of reality jar me out of my minutia and cause the dust to settle once again around me.

If I am truthful, I have so little to complain about it. Do I have a roof over my head? Yes. Do I have a food? Yes? Do I have clothes? Yes. (Oh, my, word…you should see my closets…but back to topic…) It reminds me of the verse

If we have food and covering, with these we shall be content.

1 Tim. 6:8

Think about it. Some people right now, somewhere, just want shelter, a clean bed and a hot meal. That slaps me with some quick perspective.

Now, do I mean to verbally beat up those of us living in a 1st world country? Nope, but it does help to adjust the panic or frustration of the moment. Sometimes, I just have to stop and say, “Cleansing breath…namaste.” It does, if even for a moment put a smile on my face.

Whatever is frustrating you today, I hope that this little blurb gave you a mental “breath” or “vacation” to just stop and think. It’s bad, yes. What you’re feeling is valid and yucky. But, maybe it’s survivable? I don’t know. It’s worth a shot.

🙂

Just my thoughts.

S.

It’s Presidents Day!

February 16th, 2015 by stephanie

Presidents Day.

The Wisdom of Washington.

Presidents Day:

A day off from work…for some. Sales for others…a day to remember our Commanders-in-Chief.

Our nation’s citizens used to celebrate Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday and George Washington’s separately and on different days. Not combined into one, as we do today.

  • Lincoln’s birthday was February 12th and
  • Washington’s actual date of birth is the 22nd.

Interestingly, in the 1950’s there was an actual Presidents Day Committee (that came out of California) whose goal was to turn the day into a celebration of merely the office of the Presidency.

We went from celebrating President Lincoln’s Day and President Washington’s Day to simply that of, President’s Day. Then we went to Presidents  (plural-in general) day. Clear as mud?

Anyway…wherever today finds you, perhaps this bit of wisdom from Washington will give you some advice for your week, or Presidents’ Month perhaps.

It reminds me of an ancient Proverb as well

Those who guard their lips preserve their lives, but those who speak rashly will come to ruin. – Proverbs 13:3

Just my thoughts on this icy, Presidents Day in the South.

– S.

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Veteran’s day: Saying Thanks.

November 6th, 2013 by stephanie

Each of us in our own way wish to show gratitude to those who have served.  Yet, when we try to express it, I am amazed how many of us so often feel our words are quite inadequate.

How do you properly thank someone who went through horrific moments because of their love and commitment to this country? How do you encourage the service man or woman who stood watch at some distant, lonely, God-forsaken locale and post. Feeling that no one knew, or cared? Or the one who served in an unglamorous or uneventful role, but one that matters and would be missed if left empty.

It’s not an easy task.

I am reminded of Clarence Soulliard. WWII. Army. He was 1 of only 3 that returned home from his unit of 200 that deployed. Just a kid from Pennsylvania. Shot in the face by a German sniper and many more amazing stories these pages can’t hold. He was blessed to return to his homeland.

My great uncle John, that signed up at the age of 40? He served the land he loved in the midst of a trying hour. He soon found himself in the Battle of the Bulge. If you aren’t familiar, you’ll want to “google” that horrid event. We are grateful he returned to us as well.

Then, the surprise of connecting with a cousin of mine later in life. Little did I know, he had served in Viet Nam. How we so long to make it right for those boys that came home at a time when many of our citizens (that they fought for) were so unwelcoming. Heartbreaking. Korean veterans understand as well. 

I am honored to claim these men as family and friends. And may they know they are loved by those of us, too, that hold this country of ours most dear.

Here’s to our Veterans. May they know, their labor was not in vain.
This Veteran’s Day– we honor you.

Salute,
S.

 

The Accidental Career that Changed the World.

September 4th, 2013 by stephanie

His name was Samuel. All he wanted was to be a painter. He actually managed by midlife to accomplish that dream, and, for a short time, he was able to make a living at it. Unfortunately for him, it didn’t last. For us today, that’s a very good thing.

During his lifetime, it was difficult to make a living as an artist in America. If that wasn’t enough, crises hit. His wife died; then his mother and father also died soon after. Filled with grief, he headed off to Europe to paint and reflect on life.

On his return trip home, while aboard ship, he found himself discussing new experiments in electromagnetism. Apparently, as the story goes, Sam made the following comment, “If the presence of electricity can be made visible in any part of the circuit, I see no reason why intelligence may not be transmitted by electricity.” His creative mind still spinning, he returned to his room determined to solve this new equation. But he didn’t. He later wrote:

“The only gleam of hope, and I cannot underrate it, is from confidence in God. When I look upward it calms any apprehension for the future, and I seem to hear a voice saying: ‘If I clothe the lilies of the field, shall I not also clothe you?’ Here is my strong confidence, and I will wait patiently for the direction of Providence.”

In 1843 he approached Congress—one last time. He had done this more than once, and each time they had ontinuously called his ideas ridiculous. However, on the last night of the Congressional session, Samuel B. Morse made one final attempt. Then, he went to bed, tired and disgusted. In the morning, however, he was told that a few minutes before midnight Congress had awarded him $30,000 to construct a telegraphic line between Baltimore and Washington!

Within a year the line was established, and Morse received the amazing honor of tapping out the first message by telegraph. But what message would he send? After some thought, he chose an Old Testament passage found in Numbers 23:23 of the Bible: “What hath God wrought!” To him, it said it all.

– Had his wife and parents not died,
– Had he not gone to Europe,
– Had his artistic dreams succeeded as he’d dreamed and planned,
the world would never have experienced the telegraph.

Perhaps you’re experiencing setbacks and disappointments. Maybe your projects are lacking funding. Will you, as did Morse, “…wait patiently for the direction of Providence”?
Morse went on to create several other inventions and is often recognized today as the father of faxes, modems, e-mail, the internet and other electronic communication. All I can say is, “Wow.”

It seems worth asking the question: should we allow the interruptions and discouraging moments to get the best of us? It is possible, that perhaps, in them alone, lies the spark that will light the fire for the best that is truly yet to come.

Just my thoughts.
Yours?
S.

http://www.christianhistorytimeline.com/GLIMPSEF/Glimpses/glmps099.shtml

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